Bodegas Valdespino

Eduardo Ojeda, Winemaker and Production Manager

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Country of Origin: Spain
Location: Jerez de la Frontera
People: Estevez Family, Owners | Jose Ramón Estévez, General Manager | Eduardo Ojeda, Winemaker & Production Manager

Items

Bodegas Valdespino 'Promesa' Moscatel, Jerez DO Login In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 'Toneles' Moscatel, Jerez DO Login WA 100 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino 'Contrabandista' Medium Dry Amontillado, Jerez DO Login In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino 'Inocente' Fino, Jerez DO Login WS 92 WA 94 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino 'Isabela' Cream Oloroso, Jerez DO Login WS 90 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino 'Tio Diego' Amontillado, Jerez DO Login WS 92 WA 92 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino 'Viejo C.P.' Palo Cortado, Jerez DO Login WA 93 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 'Cardenal' Palo Cortado VORS, Jerez DO Login WA 99 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 'Coliseo' Amontillado VORS, Jerez DO Login WA 99 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 2016 'Deliciosa En Rama' Manzanilla, Sanlucar de Barrameda DO Login In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 2017 'Deliciosa En Rama' Manzanilla, Sanlucar de Barrameda DO Login On Order
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 'Deliciosa' Manzanilla, Sanlucar de Barrameda DO Login WA 89 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 'Inocente' Fino, Jerez DO Login WS 92 WA 94 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino (375 ml) 'Solera de Su Majestad' Oloroso VORS, Jerez DO Login WA 93 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino 'El Candado' Pedro Ximenez, Jerez DO Login WS 93 WA 90 In Stock
Bodegas Valdespino 'Don Gonzalo' Oloroso, Jerez New! Login In Stock

The origins of this historic bodega date back to 1264 when Don Alfonso Valdespino was one of 24 knights responsible for expelling the Moors from Jerez. As a reward for his efforts the king gave him land grants in the city of Jerez and thus began Bodegas Valdespino. Although commercial activities are recorded as far back as 1430, the company was not registered until 1875. In 1883 the House of Valdespino became a purveyor of sherry to the Royal House of Spain and in 1932, they also became purveyors of sherry to the Royal House of Sweden.

In 1910, they trademarked “Sacristia” which is the area in the bodegas where the best casks of sherry are kept. Other bodegas now use this term, but it is only Valdespino who have the right to use it.

What makes Valdespino unique? The heart of Valdespino is its vineyards. It is the only sherry house to have single vineyard wines. Macharnudo Alto Vineyard is one of the ‘grand cru’ vineyards of Jerez. It is 56.2 hectares, located 5 kilometers in the northwest of Jerez, in the middle of the region in within the famous Pago Macharnudo. It is located 135 meters high over the sea level, directed to the southeast with a 10% level. The vines are grown on albariza soil or bright white chalk.

Some Valdespino wines are still fermented the traditional way, in aged oak barrels; the norm for most houses today is stainless steel fermentation. They are also one of a few estates that take the solera system to the extreme going way beyond DO minimum regulations for all the categories. As an example fino sherry is required to have 2 criaderas (nursery levels of the solera) and the DO average tends to be 3 – Valdespino’s Fino Inocente has 10 Criaderas!

Luis Gutierrez for Wine Advocate
"I’ve often called Valdespino 'the Romanee-Conti of Jerez.' Well, there, I’ve said it. To me they represent quality and tradition at the very top of the Sherry hierarchy. The winery, soleras and brands are old, registered in 1875, but with documentation about their commercial and winegrowing activities going back to the 13th century. Their recent history starts in 1999, when Jose Estevez purchases the company from the Valdespino family. Today Valdespino is the jewel in the crown of the Grupo Estevez, which also includes Real Tesoro and La Guita, who stock and age 35,000 botas of Sherry and own 800 hectares of vineyards, 56 of which come from the Pago Macharnudo, on pure white albariza soil, one of the best vineyards in the Marco de Jerez, and 17 hectares from the heart of Macharnudo are still fermented in bota today and form the core of brands like Inocente, Tio Diego, CP or Cardenal. All the wines were carefully and slowly moved to the new facilities of the Grupo Estevez on the outskirts of Jerez, where they continue their development under the supervision of Eduardo Ojeda, technical director, winemaker, who as a wine-lover is very aware of his role preserving these old soleras, wines and traditions."


Rated Top 100 Wineries of the Year by Wine & Spirits 10/15/2015
Rated Top 100 Wineries of the Year by Wine & Spirits 11/30/2013

Media Links
SFGate.com: Sherry's Great Hopes, Found at Its Fringes
The World of Fine Wine: Amontillado - A Draught from Paradise
The New York Times: Your Next Lesson - Fino Sherry
The Vine Inspiration: Valdespino and the Marcharnudo Maze
The New York Times: Sherry Sidles Out of the Drawing Room

Social Media
Twitter: @grupoestevez
Bodegas Valdespino Facebook

Reviews

  • Valdespino 'El Candado' Pedro Ximenez, Jerez DO
    The Wine Spectator
    Rating: 93 (7/31/2013)

    Offers layers of macerated date, ganache, warm caraway, buckwheat honey and chocolate-covered orange peel notes, with a deep, intense finish that lets a wonderfully smoky hint curl through. The power is obvious, the range and definition more subtle. Drink
  • Valdespino 'Tio Diego' Amontillado, Jerez DO
    The Wine Spectator
    Rating: 92 (7/31/2013)

    Smoky and taut, featuring date, dried orange peel, clove, singed sandalwood and salted caramel notes. The dry, nervy finish has lots of tension. Begs for salted almonds.
  • Valdespino 'Inocente' Fino, Jerez DO
    The Wine Spectator
    Rating: 92 (7/31/2013)

    High-pitched, featuring talc, chamomile, chalk and jicama notes, followed by a pure, stone-tinged finish. Very graceful, lacy and long.
  • Valdespino (375 ml) 'Inocente' Fino, Jerez DO
    The Wine Spectator
    Rating: 92 (7/31/2013)

    High-pitched, featuring talc, chamomile, chalk and jicama notes, followed by a pure, stone-tinged finish. Very graceful, lacy and long.
  • Valdespino 'Inocente' Fino, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 94 (8/29/2013)

    The NV Fino Inocente must be one of the few wines in Jerez that is still fermented in 600-liter American oak botas, which is an incredible amount of work compared with fermenting tens of thousands of kilos of grapes (or even more) in a big stainless steel tank. This method was the norm of yesteryear, but is so labor intense that it was discontinued in most wineries, and gives a big diversity of wines, as each barrel has its own character, which contributes to the complexity of the blend. Furthermore, the bottled wine is on average 8 to 10 years old. One other thing that makes it apart from other Finos is that the grapes are exclusively from the high part of the Macharnudo vineyard, so this is a single-vineyard Fino. The nose is very complex, showing the effect of the long lees contact: chalk, dried hay, aromatic herbs and salty almonds. The palate is full, but at the same time elegant and balanced, powerful and fine, with the texture of a Meursault rather than a Puligny. A very complex wine, that manages to be both powerful and elegant. Inocente is great value for money. Drink 2013-2016.
  • Valdespino 'Tio Diego' Amontillado, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 92 (8/29/2013)

    The NV Tio Diego Amontillado Palomino from the Macharnudo vineyard, is fermented in botas, aged biologically for 10 years under flor in a solera separated from Inocente, and with a further five years of oxidative aging. It has a beautiful, perfumed nose of dry flowers, very elegant and clean, subtle, with some saline notes, both in the nose and the palate, where it is balanced, medium-bodied and elegant. A very fine Amontillado, showing superb value for a 15-year-old wine. Drink 2013-2019.
  • Valdespino 'El Candado' Pedro Ximenez, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 90 (8/29/2013)

    The NV El Candado Pedro Ximenez, produced from sun-dried Pedro Ximenez grapes for two weeks, and aged in a solera for an average of 8-10 years, is bottled with 400 grams of sugar and 17% alcohol. Mahogany color, the nose is a symphony of candied, dried fruits, raisins, figs and dates. The palate is clean, very sweet and spicy, and should be consumed quite fresh (10?C), with chocolate dessert (or as a dessert in itself). Drink 2013-2015.
  • Valdespino (375 ml) 'Inocente' Fino, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 94 (8/29/2013)

    The NV Fino Inocente must be one of the few wines in Jerez that is still fermented in 600-liter American oak botas, which is an incredible amount of work compared with fermenting tens of thousands of kilos of grapes (or even more) in a big stainless steel tank. This method was the norm of yesteryear, but is so labor intense that it was discontinued in most wineries, and gives a big diversity of wines, as each barrel has its own character, which contributes to the complexity of the blend. Furthermore, the bottled wine is on average 8 to 10 years old. One other thing that makes it apart from other Finos is that the grapes are exclusively from the high part of the Macharnudo vineyard, so this is a single-vineyard Fino. The nose is very complex, showing the effect of the long lees contact: chalk, dried hay, aromatic herbs and salty almonds. The palate is full, but at the same time elegant and balanced, powerful and fine, with the texture of a Meursault rather than a Puligny. A very complex wine, that manages to be both powerful and elegant. Inocente is great value for money. Drink 2013-2016.
  • Valdespino 'Isabela' Cream Oloroso, Jerez DO
    The Wine Spectator
    Rating: 90 (10/31/2013)

    The rum raisin, date and burnt orange peel notes are nicely melded with fruitcake and licorice root accents, all allied to a juicy, lush frame.
  • Valdespino (375 ml) 'Cardenal' Palo Cortado VORS, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 99 (8/1/2013)

    The NV Palo Cortado Cardenal VORS, like the whole VORS collection from Valdespino is outstanding. It is fed from the solera of the Palo Cortado C.P. where the Palomino grapes come from the Macharnudo Alto vineyard, fermented in American oak botas. It’s 22% alcohol and has nine grams of (undetectable) residual sugar which makes it very drinkable. It’s a monumental wine of dark mahogany color with a green edge, a complex, ever-changing, concentrated, clean and delineated nose of spices, dark chocolate, Cuban cigar and balsamic notes of incense, and a sharp, saline palate. It is highly concentrated, powerful and clean, with an eternal, lingering aftertaste. Deciding between Coliseo and Cardenal might be splitting hairs, and as much as I love Coliseo, I felt Cardenal was just one notch above. At the quality helm of Palo Cortado. Drink 2013-2025.
  • Valdespino (375 ml) 'Solera de Su Majestad' Oloroso VORS, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 93 (8/1/2013)

    The NV Oloroso Solera de su Majestad VORS produced from Palomino grapes from the Carrascal vineyard, has aged in a solera for over 30 years. It has a bright mahogany color and a subtle nose of noble woods, walnuts, aromatic herbs, and a touch of brandy. The palate is quite gentle for a VORS. Very polished and round, with a pungent, intense feeling, it feels extremely old. One of the best Olorosos around, it’s old enough to have that extra complexity, but not to be too aggressive, as Olorosos can easily get when they’re very old. Drink 2013-2017.
  • Valdespino (375 ml) 'Coliseo' Amontillado VORS, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 99 (8/1/2013)

    The NV Amontillado Coliseo VORS, is an extremely old (much older than the 30 years certified by the VORS classification) and concentrated wine. It is unique, as its origin is from Sanlucar de Barrameda, mainly from the Pago Miraflores, which produced very sharp wines. Dark mahogany colored, with a bright green border, is very aromatic, balsamic and complex, with wild herbs, candied orange rind, spices and dates. The palate is extremely concentrated, dry, and intense but it has no edges, with lively acidity and an eternal finish. It’s an extreme wine, some might find it too much, but it’s certainly unique and among the greatest wines in the world, to be sipped slowly and in tiny quantities. One of the greatest Amontillados in existence today. Drink 2013-2025.
  • Valdespino (375 ml) 'Toneles' Moscatel, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 100 (8/1/2013)

    The NV Moscatel Toneles has reached a mythical status locally in Spain. It’s an extremely old, concentrated and powerful sweet wine that was long forgotten, because there was no market for it. The color is dark brown, almost opaque with amber-green edges. The ever-changing nose is an explosion of spices (curry and cinnamon) and noble woods, and from the sheer concentration it displays a myriad of roasted coffee, dark chocolate, balsamic herbs and even a note of coconut. After some time in the glass the roasted orange notes of Muscat come back intermixed with very spicy incense notes. Give it more time and it smells of camphor. It’s fascinating to smell it over the course of a few hours - even days. The palate is immensely concentrated, with the alcohol perfectly integrated and the extreme sweetness compensated by a piercing acidity that reminds me of some century-old Madeiras. It ends with an acute coffee note. The aftertaste is eternal. It is exceptional that such an old wine (it could be over 80 years of average age) keeps the freshness and balance, but when this happens, the wine is exceptional. A world-class sweet wine that shows what aged Muscat is able for. With its 430 grams of residual sugar, this wine is indestructible, but only 100 bottles are withdrawn and bottled yearly from a single, large cask. Drink 2013-2034.
  • Valdespino 'Viejo C.P.' Palo Cortado, Jerez DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 93 (8/1/2013)

    The NV Palo Cortado Viejo C.P. produced from Palomino from the Macharnudo Alto is feed with specific casks of Fino Inocente and Amontillado Tio Diego. It was traditionally aged in the Calle Ponce (Ponce Street), and it has kept the C.P. initials since then. It’s not age-certified, but the average age of the bottled wine is 25 years. The color is old gold or light amber, and the nose hints at a relatively old wine, with plenty of lactic notes, sweet vanilla, iodine, bitter oranges and spices. The palate is clean and delineated, subtle and on the elegant side of Palo Cortado, ending very dry. Drink 2013-2016.
  • Valdespino (375 ml) 'Deliciosa' Manzanilla, Sanlucar de Barrameda DO
    The Wine Advocate
    Rating: 89 (8/28/2013)

    The impressive line-up is opened with the pale-colored NV Manzanilla Deliciosa, which is produced with Palomino grapes from the Miraflores vineyard and aged for five years under yeast. It is a finer version of La Guita, easy to drink, with a sweet note of apples in the nose, a polished and gentle palate, ending with a saline touch.